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how deep to drill for water well in lancaster ca

2023-06-11

Situated in northern Los Angeles County, Lancaster is a city situated within the Mojave Desert’s Antelope Valley. Housing an estimated population of 156,633 people in 2019, it ranks as the 31st largest city in California and 243rd in the nation. Combined with its Southern twin city, Palmdale, Lancaster is a key part of the Antelope Valley region and California’s High Desert.

Lancaster sits approximately 70 miles (110 km) towards the northernmost periphery of Downtown Los Angeles, and is neighbored to the east by Palmdale, which is around 15 miles (24 km) away. The jaw-droppingly spectacular San Gabriel Mountains are located to the south, creating a divide between Lancaster and Los Angeles Basin. To the north lies the Tehachapi Mountains, acting as a kind of border between Lancaster and both Bakersfield and the San Joaquin Valley. The landscape around this city is primarily laid out as a smoothly spread out plain, with calming rolling hills lending an extra touch of softness to the scene. On average, Lancaster enjoys an elevation level of 2,700 feet (820 m), keeping it well above sea level. Tying parts of this tranquil territory together is the Antelope Valley Freeway (SR 14), which runs all the way through.

Lancaster experiences a semi-arid climate (Kppen climate classification BSh), which brings hot, torrid summers and cool winters. Temperatures range from the sizzling 80s and 90s F (27–37 C) from May to October and somewhat cooler 60s and 70s F (16–24 C) from November to April, reaching a record high of 113 F (45 C) on July 15, 1943 and a record low of 9 F (−13 C) on January 7, 1913. An annual precipitation of 15 inches (380 mm) mainly precipitation during the winter and spring months. Snowfall in Lancaster is infrequent but occasionally appears between December and February.

Lancaster places great importance on water as its main natural resource. Pulling from various sources, the California Aqueduct brings liquid from the Sierra Nevada Mountains while a local groundwater basin sourced from Antelope Valley provides further reserves. Additionally, the city is equipped with a well-equipped water treatment plant and a sizeable reservoir.

Lancaster relies heavily on the Antelope Valley groundwater basin as their main source of water – a large, shallow aquifer located beneath the city. This invaluable resource is fed by the generous precipitation levels in the area, and sustained by runoff from the nearby mountains. Unfortunately, this once reliable resource has recently undergone rigorous pumping, leaving it vulnerable and prone to stress. Protecting and preserving the Antelope Valley groundwater basin is of utmost importance to ensure continuing access to a dependable water supply for years to come.

To maintain the basin’s water levels, the city has an ingenious solution: drilling new wells to access subterranean reserves. The water is brought up from these reservoirs and then directed into the public pipelines, making it easier to top up existing supplies and compensate for lost liquid due to evaporation or leakage. This creative approach is proving beneficial in securing the town’s vital water resource.

For those of us in Lancaster interested in drilling a water well, the plethora of depths to consider are paramount. Strike gold and go deep- though more expensive to realize- and yield greater reward. Still, when looking to the depths, caution is key; deeper wells may be vulnerable to improper seals which can taint the water below.

When determining the appropriate depth for a water well, the needs of the particular city should be taken into account. Generally, it is advisable to drill down to a depth of at least 1,000 feet (300 m) to guarantee a steady supply of water and keep the well safe from pollutants.

When it comes to drilling a water well in Lancaster, a depth of 1,000 feet (300 m) is the optimum choice. Any shallower and the well may not provide enough water to satisfy the city’s demands. Conversely, going too deep could see costs rise exponentially and present sealing complications.



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